Tag Archives: Michael Aseidu-Siaw

Issue V – Out of Sight, Deep Inside Our Hearts

Literary genres in simplified ways help us to mitigate silence. What we can not say, we write. From everywhere around the world, we are faced with the enemy of humanity – humanity itself. Under its own construct, it proclaims hegemony, forgetting that that construct is just a product of the human agency. Whilst we were on break, we heard about the Ferguson shooting and many needless others in the US, the Charlie Hebdo shooting, the thousands who fell at Baga and the continuous assault of ISIL. Our collective response as a people to these atrocities, even more, exposed our attitudes to bodies as metaphors. We saw certain bodies as mournable; others as unmournable.

It is at juncture that our literary voices matter. It is here that we need to be bold to confront ourselves. Like the writers in this issue, our voices matter. We should speak against evil not because it relates to us but because it threatens our every existence as human beings. You will find in this issue many ways that these writers lead us to confront injustices, even as in, injustice  of nostalgia as seen in ”Igloo”. Or, confronting the physical space, of what we know in ”Drawing For Survival”. Even, breaking verbal taboo in ” I Am Looking For A Wife” and ”Fatwa/Vendetta?”  Here is the full issue:

1. I Am Looking For A Wife                                –   Sena Kodjokuma

2. Drawing For Survival                                    –    Kwame Aidoo

3. Fatwa/ Vendetta?                                         –    Michael Aseidu-Siaw

4. Lucid                                                            –    Seth Boss Kay

5. Igloo                                                             –    Nikhil Nath

6.On Third Worldedness Verse 3 To Komla      –   Dr. Teddy Totimeh

Kind regards,

Kwabena Agyare Yeboah & Aisha Nelson.

Fatwa/Vendetta?

by Michael Aseidu-Siaw

It’s Friday,
Almost time for the evening prayer.
Fix  your Cilices,
Tighten them around your thighs;
Wear your chastity belts
Or better still, tear them off!

We need them as weapons,
We need them as instruments
For we are attending a confession-
A reverend father
Is going to tell us
Why he fucked my 8-year-old nephew
In his butt.

Michael Aseidu-Siaw is a graduate of the University of Ghana.